Inspirational Hand of the Week

This post is from a series digging deeper into the stories behind the cards in our Notable Women in Computing playing card deck. The hands are for 5-card draw poker unless otherwise noted. If you’re already a Backer on Kickstarter, thank you. If not, become one today.

The second hand I’m going share is a full-house, 7s and 6s:

Notable Women in Computing_Hand2

Here are their names and achievements, original list work of my Mom:

Honoree Name Position, Honors, Awards Learn more
 - Grete Hermann Univ. of Göttingen mathematician, 1926 foundational paper for computerized algebra Wikipedia page
7 ♣ – Kathleen McKeown Professor Columbia Univ., ACM and AAAI Fellow, Founding Fellow Association for Computational Linguistics, ABI Women of Vision No Wikipedia page
7 ♦ – Sophie Vandebroek CTO Xerox, IEEE Fellow, WITI Hall of Fame, Royal Flemish Academy for Arts & Sciences Member No Wikipedia page
6  – Manuela Veloso Carnegie Mellon Univ. Professor, IEEE Fellow, AAAS Fellow Wikipedia page
6 ♣ – Helen Greiner CEO of CyPhy Works, ABI Women of Vision, WITI Hall of Fame Wikipedia page

You can help: As with all of the hands in this series, at least one of these notable women does not have a Wikipedia page. This time it’s Dr Sophie Vandebroek and Professor Kathleen McKeown. If Donald Trump has 12,000 words dedicated to him on Wikipedia, they deserves at least 100 each.

If you’re willing to write or edit an article about these incredible women, learn more about Professor McKeown and Dr Vandebroek accomplishments and get some tips on how to get started writing or editing an article on Wikipedia. If you write them, let me know and I’ll send you brownie points in an update.

Inspirational Quote:

“I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.” ― Jane Austen, Persuasion

The things that do not come with houses

Since moving to Seattle, I’ve spent some time setting up a house, rather than a manageable place to live. Most of the other places I’ve lived have had elements of beauty–maps or prints on the walls, a soft blanket here or there. But I’ve never had the chance to build a household to spec until now.

When I was in college, it was easy to find serviceable stuff. The first house I lived in after leaving the dorms came stocked with 6 beds, 2 couches, 3 rice-makers and approximately 147 forks. All of it had been abandoned by other students, and our rat-landlord charged us to haul it out at the end of our lease. The experience of living around the flaws of the objects is useful, but because this time I had some time, I chose to create a house in Seattle where most of the objects fit my and Matthew’s patterns.

This has led to me realizing that there are things that do not come with houses. Somehow this far into adulthood I had always imagined some things just came with the lease. In no particular order, here are some of those things:

  • Calvin and Hobbes bathroom books
  • Cutting-boards wide enough to dice carrots on
  • Magnets
  • Wire shelving inserts
  • Hedge-clippers
  • Picture-frames
  • Floor rugs
  • A broom

These are all things that I saw in so many houses growing up that some part of my brain had reduced them to permanent objects that traveled through the world with houses. I never saw an adult buy a broom, or a wire-shelving insert. I watched my Mom buy rugs and magnets, but that there were refrigerators that existed in a pre-magnet state never rose to mind.

I spent the last few months slowly accumulating these things, along with baskets and boxes and coat-hanger-replacements. It has been a transitional adult moment, like the time I realized I should put a nail through the wall rather stick than a Command hook on it. Like the time I realized that buying meat for a fresh meal meant I needed to cook the meat that day.

There are restrictions that come with adult life that I’m starting to see from the inside. Meat goes bad if you don’t cook soon; crooked paintings are more annoying than spending the time to fix them is worth. And there are things that do not come with houses.

Inspirational Quote:

“[T]he world would be a better place if more engineers, like me, hated technology. The stuff I design, if I’m successful, nobody will ever notice. Things will just work, and be self-managing.” — Radia Perlman

Inspirational Hand of the Week

This is the first post in a series digging deeper into the stories behind the cards in our Notable Women in Computing playing card deck. The hands are for 5-card draw poker unless otherwise noted. If you’re already a Backer on Kickstarter, thank you. If not, become one today.

The first hand I’m going share is a 2 pair, Queen* high:

Notable Women in Computing_Hand1

Here are their names and achievements, original list work of my Mom:

Honoree Name Position, Honors, Awards Learn more
Queen ♦ – Anita Borg Founder Anita Borg Institute, WITI Hall of Fame, Fellow ACM, EFF Pioneer Wikipedia page
10 ♦ – Cristina Amon Univ. of Toronto Dean-Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, IEEE Fellow, SWE Achievement Award, Canadian Academy of Eng., Spanish Royal Academy, Royal Society of Canada, US NAE Wikipedia page
5 ♦ – Laurie Hendren Professor McGill Univ., ACM Fellow, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada No Wikipedia page
10 ♠ – Clarisse Sieckenius de Souza Professor PUC Rio de Janeiro, CHI Academy No Wikipedia page
5 ♣ – Mary Lou Jepsen Google X Head of the Display Division, ABI Women of Vision, WITI Hall of Fame Wikipedia page

You can help: As with all of the hands in this series, at least one of these notable women does not have a Wikipedia page. This time it’s Professors Clarisse Sieckenius de Souza and Professor Laurie Hendren. If Donald Trump has 12,000 words dedicated to him on Wikipedia, they deserves at least 100 each.

If you’re willing to write or edit an article about these incredible women, learn more about Professor de Souza and Dr Hendren’s accomplishments here and get some tips on how to get started writing or editing an article on Wikipedia. If you write them, let me know and I’ll send you brownie points in an update.

*As an aside, in our deck Queens rank above Kings.

Inspirational Quote:

“Above all, be the heroine of your life, not the victim.” ― Nora Ephron

The Donald Trump Test for Wikipedia Relevance

I was writing a post about increasing the number of notable women in computing with Wikipedia pages (as part of this project) and was trying to articulate why it was important.

At the heart, it’s because I think all 160 women who are on this list of notable women in computing who don’t have Wikipedia pages are more important than Donald Trump. Donald Trump, racist, politically promiscuous, awful Donald Trump, has a 12,000 word article dedicated to him on Wikipedia. If Donald Trump gets 12,000 words, then every single one of those 160 women deserve at least 100 words describing the ways they’ve advanced humanity and technology.

If you want to take a stand against Donald Trump getting more digital ink than these incredible women, commit to writing a Wikipedia page for one of them. You can read tips on how here, final all the information you need, comment here to let me know you’ve done it and I’ll send some public brownie points your way. Because it’s ridiculous that Donald Trump has more visibility than this woman, who gave thousands of women from developing countries their first email addresses. Ridiculous, unnecessary, and fixable.

Inspirational Quote:

“For most of history, Anonymous was a woman.” ― Virginia Woolf

Notable Women in Computing Card Deck Kickstarter is at 100%!

The Kickstarter I’ve been running and talking about since Thursday is at 100%. With 27 days left, I’m hopeful we can triple or quadruple the number of decks we’re sending out to the world.

It’s been an exciting week, getting a crash-course in ecommerce logistics and Kickstarter communication norms, even getting to know some folks who take card design very seriously.

If you’ve been on the fence about becoming a Backer for the deck, now is a good time to do it. You’ll still be one of the first 100 backers and still get a copy (or copies–a lot of folks are choosing the Give 1/Get 1 option). You can learn more about the project by looking through my archives or my Mom’s posts. Happy Saturday!

Notable-Women-in-Computing_Royal-Flush-Hearts

Inspirational Quote:

“If I am remembered at all, I would like to be remembered as my family storyteller. It has been a great life.” — Kay McNulty Mauchly Antonelli, who is remembered as one of the original six female programmers of ENIAC, software designer for BINAC and UNIVAC I,